{PINNED} I hate this part, but… (with thoughts added later)

I have bills coming, and just about no money. If anyone was thinking maybe my law, policy, research paper, and polling analyses — here and at The Zelman Partisans — not to mention free books (I’ve noticed some folks linking to those recently, for which I am thankful) are worth anything, now would be an excellent time.
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You’d think the AJC would have learned by now

…so I assume it’s deliberate.

Remember last year, when the Atlanta Urinal-Constipation claimed a reporter built an assault rifle (and even claimed it was legal to sell them “with no identifying marks”)?

After I slipped the ATF a little note, and tipped off reporter Ken Foskett that he and his Channel 2 buds Wade and Regan had just confessed to a major felony, they… gradually corrected the story to reflect that it wasn’t actually, you know, an assault rifle. “Gradually,” because they changed the headline, but forgot to change the graphic. And the HTML header. And the URL.

So you’d think AUC would know the difference between an AR-15 and an assault rifle.

Nope. They ran a poll and asked:

Do you favor or oppose banning assault rifles like the AR-15 and the AK-47?

I’ll grant that the AK-47 is an assault rifle. But aside from a few that got grandfathered in, they’ve been mostly banned since May, 1986. The AR-15 isn’t an assault rifle at all.

And let me preemptively head off their inevitable counter: This was a Georgia poll. In Georgia there is no such thing as an “assault weapon” either. And those jurisdictions that do define “assault weapon” all do so differently.

So the Urinal-Constipation is deliberately asking a a biased, invalid question, designed to mislead respondents, just to generate so numbers that make it look like a majority favors a gun ban.

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Climate Change Idiocy

Every time I think the climate change alarmists have hit peak stupid, they take that as a challenge to prove me wrong.

How One Commonly Used Asthma Inhaler is Damaging the Planet
The problem with MDIs is not carbon dioxide (the most common greenhouse gas), but rather methane, which represents a far smaller share of greenhouse emissions, but a much more powerful one, with up to 84 times the heat-trapping power of CO2. Even the least polluting inhaler was found to emit methane at levels equal to up to 10 kg (22 lbs.) of carbon dioxide into the air over the course of its 200-puff lifetime. The worst emitted the equivalent of more than 36 kg (79 lbs) of CO2.

Jeffrey Kluger (Twitter) is talking about this study, which he clearly didn’t read.

Let’s look at the first problem, which most clearly illustrates Kluger’s remarkable (dare I say “peak”) stupidity. The study didn’t mention methane. That isn’t what they looked at. At issue is something hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs), the propellant in inhalers. (Update: After four days, they finally corrected the “methane” error. But they added another one saying that only one type of MDI uses HFAs.)

But let’s have a little fun. HFAs are allegedly potent greenhouse gases, according to the paper around 1,300 times as potent as CO2. Thus, 1 ounce of HFA is the “warming” equivalent of 1,300 ounce of CO2.

The “worst” inhaler in the study is good for 120 doses. Depending on the use, you might use it as often as twice a day, or no more than twice a week. Let’s roll with the twice a day scenario. It should last two months, yielding the CO2 equivalency of 36.5 kilograms, or 80.5 pounds.

That works out to 1.34 pounds of CO2 equivalency per day. Remember; this is the worst case scenario: most usage of the worst inhaler.

The best case is twice a week with the best inhaler in the paper, good for 200 doses. That’s the CO2 equivalent of 0.027 pounds per day.

Putting that in perspective: the average human exhales 2.3 pounds of actual CO2 per day.

So, in the time from when Kluger exposed his idiocy to now, he has exhaled around 9.2 pounds of actual CO2. A worst case inhaler user would have averaged 5.36 pounds equivalency in the same period. A best caser user would be at 0.11 pounds.

Just by breathing, Kluger has contributed 1.7 to 83.6 times as much CO2 equivalent as an measured-does inhaler.

I won’t call this one peak stupidity, out of fear of what “horrifying” doomsday scenario they’s dream up next.

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More Recent Columns

I’m trying to post here, but it looks like most of my recent activity is elsewhere.

The Zelman Partisans

The Truth About Guns

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Snail mail, for cash, checks, Amazon referrals or gift list stuff. Heck, I’ve only got 12 days left on my Tracfone!

New Zealand “Buyback” Report: 30,503

Previous reports


The average payout per surrendered firearm has increased by another NZ$8.06, over the mid-October numbers.

Here are the mid-October numbers in comparison to the latest NZP official numbers (10/29/2019).

10-14-209
Cat A Banned: 23,729
Cat E banned: 3,903
Total: 27,632
Program cost is averaging NZ$2029.16 per firearm
estimated total cost at NZ$486,998,400 (up)

And here are the final October numbers
Cat A banned: 26,095
Cat E banned: 4,408
Total: 30,503
Program cost is averaging NZ$2037.22 per firearm (up)
Estimated total cost at NZ$488,932,983 (up)

Running Compliance total: 12.71% (using last .gov estimate of 240,000 firearms).

Cat E compliance: 30.4% (using estimate of 14,500 firearms). Fewer than 1 in 3 registered owners of registered Cat E firearms are complying so far.

Projection: They are averaging 2.82% compliance per month, for 4.5 months. I guesstimate 16.94% final compliance if rates remain steady.

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JPFO Steps In It

When the wonderful Aaron Zelman passed away, Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership fell upon hard times. The directors chose to sell it to someone they thought could keep it going. To the dismay of several members and workers, they chose to pass JPFO on to Alan Gottlieb.

Dismay, because Aaron — and a great many of us — regarded Gottlieb as a compromiser who is actually a danger to Second Amendment-protected human/civil rights.
Recently, JPFO ran a column by Richard Douglas, “How Do We Solve Gun Related Violence Without Sacrificing Our Rights?”. My reaction to that piece appearing on the JPFO site was:

“With JPFO publishing this utter BS, we can slip a generator drive belt around Aaron Zelman’s body and power the entire state of Wisconsin.”

Some have wondered why I objected to the column. Allow me to explain.

There are several problems, starting with endorsement of the Kansas City experiment (and the Project Exile it was testing). That included preemptive, no-cause intimidation visits and no-cause stop&frisks. People were being arrested for firearm possession, not for committing real crimes with firearms. The experiment was flawed anyway, since the starting demographics of the test and control beats were dissimilar, and they didn’t examine changing demographics.

Then the guy equates industry development of automotive technology to CDC sociological research, and concludes that inventing better brakes means the CDC should study “causes” gun violence. If the CDC did all the research into car crashes, they’d still be ignoring the young male demographic that the insurance and car rental industries already know are the main problem, while testing for the influence of existential angst on middle-aged women drivers, and banning automotive tech innovation.

He buys into the view that the Dickey Amendment shut down research. It didn’t even shut down CDC research; they just didn’t publish findings that didn’t support the anti-rights agenda.

Statistically speaking, we already know where “gun” violence occurs, who is doing it, to whom, when, and why. The only “research” needed for the overall problem is a field test: arrest, convict, and imprison; for real crimes against real people. Compare that to catch&release (ie- Chicago) and see which process lowers crime.

Outliers like public mass shootings unrelated to trafficking and gangs, or terrorism, may be worthy of actual study. I suggest looking for ways to spot problems without turning us into a totalitarian surveillance state. And since the state will always have an interest in expanding its power, that’s an automatic argument against having the state do the research.

From working with Aaron, I think he would have agreed with my assessment, and he would have seen this as more of why he disapproved of Gottlieb. The only way Aaron would have published that column would have been as a “know your enemy” warning.

Others, including David Codrea, also expressed outrage.

” JPFO founder Aaron Zelman strongly opposed such edicts:”

>

In the face of such criticism, JPFO appears to be backpedaling.

“It was a “guest opinion” piece, and, as JPFO sees it for what it is, and appreciates your reaction (along with your other work), there’s an official JPFO statement on the way for “the rest of the story,” as JPFO sees this particular subject matter. Thank you. All the best.”

If the Vichy JPFO disagreed with Douglas, and meant this as an opposition piece, they should have noted it at the time; not waited until they were criticized over it. Compare that to censorship of pro-2A writers by Gottlieb.

The forthcoming “official JPFO statement” should be interesting.

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More Stuff Published Elsewhere

I used to title these updates as something along the lines of “more Zelman Partisans columns,” but I’m also writing for The Truth About Guns now. So…

The Zelman Partisans

The Truth About Guns

Dang; 13 more columns just since October 4th, not counting my own blog posts.

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“Space Satellite”

Did you hear about the space satellite that crashed on a Michigan farm?

I first heard about it when I failed to check the URL before clicking a link, and ended up at New York Daily News. The reporting was as bad as you’d expect from NYDN

Yeah. No.

Not a satellite. That’s the payload package from a high altitude balloon. Specifically, it’s one Samsung launched as a “Space Selfie” advertising campaign.

Those balloons typical reach altitudes between 18 and 37 kilometers. I believe the current record is 53 kilometers. Space starts at the Karman Line; 100 kilometers. So much for the “space” descriptor. Anyone participating in Samsung’s campaign might want to check the fine print; if they say “space,” you might hit them for false advertising.

Possibly Samsung found someone smart enough to specify “near space,” the region in the atmosphere above which a human requires a pressure suit and oxygen to survive but below the Karman Line.

A satellite is an object in a gravitationally curved trajectory around another body.* A balloon floats in atmosphere. Scratch “satellite.”

ABC also ran with the “space satellite” story, but invented the term “pseudo satellite.” Presumably because they couldn’t spell “balloon.” Or maybe Cathey confused an airborne balloon with a terrestrial pseudolite.

Wonder of wonders, NBC managed to get the story almost right.

“It looked like a satellite.”
[…]
“No injuries occurred and the balloon was subsequently retrieved,”
[…]
The device reportedly included a high-altitude balloon…

So close. And then…

…and was supposed to remain in space until Oct. 31.

“Space.” See above re: Karman Line, Stelloh and Samandi.

Ah, well. What else can you expect from an industry that believes in semiautomatic assault rifles and carbon as a deadly poison that will wipe out life on Earth?


* There are also “Non-Keplerian orbits” in which the trajectory is modified by thrust. That would included the boost phase from low Earth orbit to a final geosynchronous orbit for a communications satellite.

An extreme example is a hypothetical polar stationary satellite, which would remain high above the rotational pole balancing on constant thrust just enough to counter gravity. I don’t if it’s ever actually been tried, but the proposal pops up occasionally as a way to provide comm coverage to polar regions largely outside the reach of equatorial geosynch satellites.

Amusingly, two of my books (Bargaining Position, and an unpublished draft) have lighter-than-air vessels (dirigibles) that do go into space. The concept is that they float/drive high into the stratosphere, then fire main boosters to blast out of the remaining atmosphere and up to orbital velocity. Reentry is the opposite; fire engines to come to a virtual stop and rather gently drop into the upper atmosphere. Perhaps Samsung would like to license my idea.

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