FBI Demonstrates Firearms “Expertise” Again

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Remember the “Beltway Sniper,” who the FBI was certain was a skilled ex-Army sniper, despite missing stationary, man-sized targets at 60 yards, with a rifle?

I thought that spoke volumes about the FBI’s shooting skills (roughly on par with the NYPD’s).

They haven’t gotten any better.

Pennsylvania Bank Robbery Duo May Have Military Training, FBI Says
Two men wanted in a string of Pittsburgh-area bank robberies may have had military or law enforcement training, FBI officials said.
[…]
The FBI said the robbers’ weapons-handling skills, including holstering their guns, show extreme precision beyond usual bank robbers.

Surveillance video from the robberies show the men holding their weapons with their fingers off the trigger and on the barrel of the gun (emphasis added-cb), a safety method taught to officers and military personnel.

Dear Bog, they have to be highly trained super-pros because they know to keep their booger hooks off the bang switches.

If they know the rest of the Four Rules, they’re probably Navy SEALs.

Or just smarter than the average Feeble Bureaucratic Incompetent.

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6 thoughts on “FBI Demonstrates Firearms “Expertise” Again

  1. MamaLiberty April 18, 2015 / 8:42 am

    None of my students are police or military. Not one of them would DREAM of putting their finger on the trigger until ready to actually shoot. At least not after the first time. Oh, and some of my students are in their 70s.

    What a bunch of maroooons.

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  2. Tom Bri April 24, 2015 / 5:55 pm

    Heh. I have a video of myself firing 9mm loaded with pyrodex. After a few mags it started hanging up on every round. Fired fine, just didn’t eject the cartridge. So I had to clear after every round. I was quite pleased to see that I kept the gun pointed down-range, and my finger was visible, straight and off the trigger, on every clear. No military or police training, just read lots of magazine articles about gun handling, and…had one occasion where I let off a round when I wasn’t expecting it. That scared me into much more careful habits. Reasonably smart people learn to handle guns properly, and, pretty often ‘trained’ people don’t.

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    • Bear April 24, 2015 / 6:38 pm

      Ooookay… I’ll bite: Why did you have 9mm loaded with Pyrodex?

      Could’ve been worse,though. Ever read Guns of the South where the Confederates are trying to get AK-47s to run on blackpowder?

      In fact, during all my military and peace officer time, no one ever presented the Four Rules as such (unless you count a couple of gunnies, not trainers).

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      • Thomas Bridgeland April 24, 2015 / 9:14 pm

        It worked so well in .45. We shot at night, so lots of flames and sparks from the barrel, and the Springfield 1911 clone just kept on eating them up. So we tried in .38, which was a black powder round originally. Oddly, very poor performance. So, why not 9mm? It ‘worked’ for about one mag, then just got too gummed up. Daytime shooting turned out to be pretty fun too, with the clouds of smoke. I didn’t realize my brother was pointing his camera at me until later, so I was pretty happy not to be embarrassed by poor handling practices.

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      • Thomas Bridgeland April 24, 2015 / 9:18 pm

        Guns of the South. Read a preview, it didn’t catch me, so I didn’t buy it. Funny, if you had uptime aid in the form of AK47s, why not also bring the recipe for gun cotton? First generation smokeless would have been easily within the abilities of the South in 1860.

        On Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 8:14 PM, Thomas Bridgeland wrote:

        > It worked so well in .45. We shot at night, so lots of flames and sparks > from the barrel, and the Springfield 1911 clone just kept on eating them > up. So we tried in .38, which was a black powder round originally. Oddly, > very poor performance. So, why not 9mm? It ‘worked’ for about one mag, then > just got too gummed up. Daytime shooting turned out to be pretty fun too, > with the clouds of smoke. I didn’t realize my brother was pointing his > camera at me until later, so I was pretty happy not to be embarrassed by > poor handling practices. > > On Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 5:38 PM, Random Acts of Gibberish <

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        • Bear April 24, 2015 / 9:32 pm

          GoS was okay, but I wouldn’t have paid the full, new price. I got it at a second hand shop.

          As I recall, the uptimers were deliberately keeping the Confederates dependent on them, so they could control ’em. The Confederates figure out quick enough that their goals aren’t necessarily the same, and are trying to figure out how to reload. When blackpowder experiments mostly flopped, they began looking into a hint accidentally dropped by one future guy (he gave Lee some nitro heart pills and mentioned nitro in connection with “smokeless powder”).

          Actually, guncotton predated the Civil War (but purity issues kept it from being used and produced for firearms propellent) , and that was — I think — the direction the CSA was looking.

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